We are experiencing problems with our case search, and working to resolve those issues as soon as possible. We apologize for any inconvenience.


Home Jury ServicesThe Verdict

The Verdict

In your efforts to reach a verdict, keep in mind that you should consider only the evidence that was presented in the courtroom. You should not guess or speculate about things not discussed in court, but you can draw reasonable conclusions from the evidence presented.

It is important to take the case you are deciding seriously. After all, if you were a party in the case, it would be important to you, and you would want the jury to give it serious consideration even if the controversy appears less significant to others.

All jurors should deliberate and vote on each issue to be decided in the case. When it is time to count votes, it is the foreperson's duty to see that this is done properly. In a civil case, the judge will tell you how many jurors must agree in order to reach a verdict. In a criminal case, the jury verdict must be unanimous. If the required number of jurors agree on each issue to be decided, the foreperson will sign and date the verdict, advise the bailiff, and return to the courtroom and await further instruction by the judge.

If a jury cannot arrive at a verdict within a reasonable time and indicates to the judge that there is no possibility that they can reach a verdict, the judge, in his or her discretion, may dismiss the jury. This situation is a mistrial, sometimes referred to as a "hung jury", and may mean the case goes to trial again with a new jury.